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Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO)
The AMO is an ongoing series of long-duration changes in the sea surface temperature of the North Atlantic Ocean, with cool and warm phases that may last for 20-40 years at a time and a difference of about 1°F between extremes. These changes are natural and have been occurring for at least the last 1,000 years. Source: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/phod/amo_faq.php
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Atmospheric Composition
Understanding Atmospheric Composition is both simple and handy in understanding how mankind can influence climate. Many people think the atmosphere is just too big for humans to influence? It sounds like a reasonable statement, until you realize that you don't need to change the whole atmosphere to change climate... you just need to change a little bit of it.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Attribution
Climate attribution literally has to do with what causes something, or "to explain by indicating a cause". With regard to climate and weather it is important to understand the differences between what attribution can be assigned to climate and/or weather events at a given moment, or over a span of time. The longer the span of time, the more the attribution moves away from weather and towards climate, and vice versa.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Climate Models
GCM's (General Circulation Models) or sometimes mistakenly referred to as Global Climate Model, Typically refers to a three-dimensional model of the global atmosphere used in climate modeling (often erroneously called “Global Climate Model”). This term often requires additional qualification (e.g., as to whether or not the atmosphere is fully coupled to an ocean as in AOGCM, which stands for Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Model.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Climate Feedback/Sensitivity
Climate Feedbacks: An interaction mechanism between processes in the climate system is called a climate feedback, when the result of an initial process triggers changes in a second process that in turn influences the initial one. A positive feedback intensifies the original process, and a negative feedback reduces it.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Climate Forcing
Climate forcing has to do with the amount of energy we receive from the sun, and the amount of energy we radiate back into space. Variances in climate forcing are determined by physical influences on the atmosphere such as orbital and axial changes as well as the amount of greenhouse gas in our atmosphere.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Dansgaard Oeschger Events
The (estimated) 1470 Year Climate Cycle - Often quoted as the 1500 year cycle is a popular red herring used by S. Fred Singer and Dennis Avery. It is also a real climate cycle known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events. It is of unknown origin.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Galactic Cosmic Rays
Galactic Cosmic Rays have been considered as a possible relevant cause in our current global warming event. Examinations of claims that galactic cosmic rays are responsible four our current global warming event have been assessed through peer review and peer response. The consensus remains that there is no significant correlation between galactic cosmic rays and climate change, especially in relation to our current warming event.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Greenhouse Gases/Effect
Greenhouse Gases (GHG's) are the various gases that block outgoing long-wave infrared from easily leaving our atmosphere. The Greenhouse Effect (GHE) is the physical mechanism of this blocking mechanism in our atmosphere that influence how much heat we retain within the atmosphere.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Greenland Ice Melt
The ice is melting in Greenland. The ice melt rate is also accelerating. What does this mean? That depends on your context in time, your geographic location, and ultimately, why it is happening?
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming