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1989 - Margaret Thatcher
Margaret Thatcher delivered a speech in 1989 that was powerful, compelling and succinct. She accurately described the potentials for mankind in reasoned tones if we did not address global warming. Themes: Agriculture, Energy, Environment, Foreign policy (general discussions), Foreign policy (development, aid, etc), Foreign policy (International organizations), Science and technology, Transport
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Attribution
Climate attribution literally has to do with what causes something, or "to explain by indicating a cause". With regard to climate and weather it is important to understand the differences between what attribution can be assigned to climate and/or weather events at a given moment, or over a span of time. The longer the span of time, the more the attribution moves away from weather and towards climate, and vice versa.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Arctic Ice Melt
It is important to understand that ice mass and ice extent are two entirely different animals when it comes to understanding what is happening in the Arctic. The ice mass at the North Pole is rapidly diminishing. The effects of global warming on the Arctic ice is more pronounced due to the Arctic Amplification effect.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Volcanoes Emit more CO2 than Mankind
This is a pervasive myth that continues to circulate. The idea that volcanoes put out more CO2 than mankind through human industrial output is patently false. Volcanoes put out around 0.2 Gt (200 million tons of CO2). The facts are clear and measured. As of 2010, humans put out on average of around 27Gt (Twenty Seven 'Gigatons') of CO2 per year. That's 2,700 million tons compared to natural cycles 200 million ton output.
Located in Projects & Resources / / Global Warming / Myths vs. Facts: Global Warming
Arctic Oscillation (AO)
The Arctic Oscillation (AO) is a large scale mode of climate variability, also referred to as the Northern Hemisphere annular mode. The AO is a climate pattern characterized by winds circulating counterclockwise around the Arctic at around 55°N latitude.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
IPCC Reports
IPCC Reports
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
ClimateGate
The goal here is to provide a reasoned context and rebuttal regarding distorted views of the 'ClimateGate' emails. This is simply done by providing relevant context to statements of interest. The crime: A hacker illegally broke into a computer server at the University of East Anglia involving the Climate Research Unit (CRU). As always, context is key. Once the real context is understood, the emails make sense and the idea of conspiracy, scientific malfeasance, or fraud, is revealed to be unfounded.
Located in Projects & Resources / / Global Warming / Myths vs. Facts: Global Warming
Arctic/Polar Amplification Effect
The Arctic/Polar Amplification Effect is mainly caused by a combination of a few things. The chief components include the magnitude of change regarding ice extent and snow cover loss allows for a more dramatic change in climate architecture of the polar region. This also relates to the amount of land in the northern hemisphere verses the southern hemisphere.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Ian Plimer
Ian Pilmer, an Australian geologist, wrote a book of which its premise is described as pointing out that climate research is driven by the prospect of research funding. Generally speaking, institution and government scientists make the same amount of money no matter what they study. Grant funding, unlike bailout money, goes to equipment and research work, not salaries and golden parachutes.
Located in Projects & Resources / / Global Warming / Myths vs. Facts: Global Warming
Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO)
The AMO is an ongoing series of long-duration changes in the sea surface temperature of the North Atlantic Ocean, with cool and warm phases that may last for 20-40 years at a time and a difference of about 1°F between extremes. These changes are natural and have been occurring for at least the last 1,000 years. Source: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/phod/amo_faq.php
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming