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Oceanic Systems
Current climate conditions trends and averages: Oceans: Sea Level Rise (SLR), Sea Surface Temperature (SST), Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies (SSTA), Sea Surface Height (SSH), Sea Surface Salinity (SSS). Some animations included.
Located in Projects & Resources / / Global Warming / Current Climate Conditions
Global Climate Monitor
Global Climate Monitor: Global Climate Monitoring of the Climate System allows a clear overview of how the system is currently behaving in response to global warming and natural variation. Climate change indicators: Global Mean Temperature (GMT); Hemispheric Temperature Variance; Greenhouse gases; Arctic, Antarctic Ice Extent and Volume; Ocean Oscillations; Sea Level Rise (SLR); Solar Cycle Data; Sea Surface Temperatures and Anomalies; Global Fire Activity, Drought.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO)
The AMO is an ongoing series of long-duration changes in the sea surface temperature of the North Atlantic Ocean, with cool and warm phases that may last for 20-40 years at a time and a difference of about 1°F between extremes. These changes are natural and have been occurring for at least the last 1,000 years. Source:
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Climate Models
GCM's (General Circulation Models) or sometimes mistakenly referred to as Global Climate Model, Typically refers to a three-dimensional model of the global atmosphere used in climate modeling (often erroneously called “Global Climate Model”). This term often requires additional qualification (e.g., as to whether or not the atmosphere is fully coupled to an ocean as in AOGCM, which stands for Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Model.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Dansgaard Oeschger Events
The (estimated) 1470 Year Climate Cycle - Often quoted as the 1500 year cycle is a popular red herring used by S. Fred Singer and Dennis Avery. It is also a real climate cycle known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events. It is of unknown origin.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)
The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is a measure of the strength of the westerlies across the North Atlantic. Originally defined by Sir Gilbert Walker in 1932 as the difference in pressure between Ponta Delgada on the Azores and Stykkisholmur in Iceland.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO)
ENSO stands for El Niño/ Southern Oscillation. The ENSO cycle refers to the coherent and sometimes very strong year-to-year variations in sea- surface temperatures, convective rainfall, surface air pressure, and atmospheric circulation that occur across the equatorial Pacific Ocean. El Niño and La Niña represent opposite extremes in the ENSO cycle.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Southern Oscillation Index (SOI)
The Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) is one measure of the large-scale fluctuations in air pressure occurring between the western and eastern tropical Pacific (i.e., the state of the Southern Oscillation) during El Niño and La Niña episodes. Traditionally, this index has been calculated based on the differences in air pressure anomaly between Tahiti and Darwin, Australia.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming
Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)
The Pacific Decadal Oscillation is a long-term fluctuation of the Pacific Ocean that waxes and wanes between cool and warm phases approximately every 5 to 20 years. In the cool phase, higher than normal sea-surface heights caused by warm water from a horseshoe pattern that connects the north, west and southern Pacific, with cool water in the middle. During most of the 1980s and 1990s, the Pacific was locked in the oscillation's warm phase, during which these warm and cool regions are reversed.
Located in Projects & Resources / Environment / Global Warming